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monthly income. >> you can enroll in free educational services online. just as it -- visit sfsmartmoney.org. with services like financial education classes and one-on-one meetings with advisers, asset smart money network makes it easy for you to learn all you need to know about managing, saving, investing, and protecting your money. the network offers access to hundreds of financial aid programs. to help their eruptions, fill out the quick questionnaire, and you will be steered to the program you are looking for. >> who want to make sure everyone has the chance to manage their money successfully, keep their money safe, and avoid getting ripped off. >> it sounds very good. i think people should try that one. >> to find out more, visit sfsmartmoney.org or call 211 and ask about the bank on s.f. program. >> now you can have a bank account. open one today. >> and it is my honor to introduce governor jerry brown of california. i think. ok. in ibm research, one of the things we talk about is our laboratories. i have been all over the world, live in different countries. i am a relatively recen
or an educator but i think if these kids are hungry i guess my solution would be, eat your mother [bleep] lunch! (laughter) you know whose's not hungry in your old pal remmy counting out in the dumpster. because you gave him your lunch. so the usda which has been setting guidelines for subsidized school lunch force the past, oh, i don't know, 70 years, has, i'm trying to curb what everybody agree says childhood obesity problem changed the last year's school lunch men fru cheese pizza, canned pie nap app-- ian apple, tater tots into whole wheat cheez pizzar, applesauce and low fat milk. oooh. why is this news? >> new guidelines thanks to michelle obama, michelle obama school lunch calorie limits. >> michelle obama nutritional school lunches. >> jon: oh, man, oh, right, that's right. because this isn't really about food or kids. it's about big government uber thanny michelle obama who if she said we feed clean air half the country would demand gills because freedom! listen the complaint. >> the usda shouldn't be deciding how many calories we take or how many calories we expend during the day. at
tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. >>grant: nfl replacement rest got it wrong and it cost the packers the game. people are sounding off on facebook. we asked people, what do you think about this debacle. >> we always want to know we you think. heads our kron4 facebook fan page to do that. does >>pam: a pregnant woman injured in shooting in oakland. kron4 is on the scene, and we will have a live update at 5:30 p.m.. >> today we're looking at science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality. >> governor brown visited the google headquarters to sign a bill that allows a global driverless cars one step closer to our roads. >>pam: a few other new laws signed today. a new plan for state parks in the wake of plant closures and the scandal. those stories and more coming up at 5:30 p.m.. [ laughter ] [ girl ] wow. you
to look it up on the website. and the board of education by four aye's and approve the amount made available to reinstate a settlement fund. in the matter of san francisco unified school district versus pierce street the board of education by four aye's and three absent approve authorization for district and insurance company to pursue damage claim through litigation if necessary. for the read out for tonight's closed session september 25, 2012 public employment the board by a vote of six aye's and one absence approved the contract for one assistant superintendent. other items posted in the agenda is the staff report and classified personnel transactions. meeting adjourned. thank you very much. >> a lot a ton with the community and we say to ourselves, there is this one and this one. we all compartmentalize them, we have our own agenda. our agenda is to create great work. if you are interested in that, you are part of our community. >> hello and welcome to brava theater. >> we are trying to figure out a way to make a space where theater and presentation of live work is something
to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah, blah, blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no, we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if dad was snoring on the couch, we muscled through it. is she for real? your generation has it made. [ male announcer ] the wireless receiver. only from at&t u-verse. get a free wireless receiver with a qualifying u-verse plan. rethink possible. >> tomorrow afternoon, a lot of fees at noon, i do not think it will get that much warmer tomorrow. i think it was the low 80s out there, possibly '90s in morgan hill. for the inland valleys we have a better chance of seeing nineties in fact we will in places like antioch and livermor
to education we are not. we are dead last. as the world becomes more technoledge kal, 20 years from now, what is america. when we are boeing to understand the technology that we are going to be relying upon. >> if you go to ghettos, i survived and escaped it shlg. moved my family out. people in the ghetto have no clue of where we are going. that is what we need to get them excited on. we need to get them excited about stem. educating people to caulk into the world and contribute and participate. the common thread throughout the middle east and america is a lot of young people who have had education in middle eastern countries, and there is no job at the end of the line for them and this creates huge resentment and frustration you have seen a lot of leaders being toppled. what do leaders and countries need to adopt to stop this cycle now youth who feel not able to fulfill their potential? >> economic development. when you have young people with amazing ideas. you don't have the system to actually deal with this huge issue add to that the governments that have fallen, the new structures and the
we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. >>> a fire overnight in vallejo cause a lot of damage to the law offices of major cause b davis. the fire chief says the fire is suspicious. >>> the lead chris stevens, he was the ambassador to be ahead killed in an attack in libya in because he. tomorrow here on l, talk, remems there was a ticket on the milk carden that to get you to be game for free. >>> californian voters have the chance to abolish the death penalty in november. the debate over prop. 34. and you are a last look at the weather forecast today >>> things are going to he the. today we will be in the extended. he'd advisory beginning in the bay area beginning tomorrow nineties in the bay. it is rare so enjoy it prayed >>> de the will be breaking any new records? >>> no. at the will come close. >>> a guy in
different choices in education. you see one young man majoring in math and science. one young women majoring in, actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofits and working shorter hours and you see more men in investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. now, a man and then the woman who start off at goldman sachs, they start out the same, they should be paid the same, but if they are not, there are avenues to dispute. that is the difference. >> host: what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> guest: i think they need to have a council on men and boys. you can see the young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, the single men have lower earnings. you can see that their are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. if th
or form, but when it comes to education, we are not. we are dead last when it comes to education. as the world becomes more technological, 20 years from now, what is america? when you didn't even educate the people to understand the technology we are relying upon? so, you know, if you go to ghettos, i survived and escaped the ghetto, moved my whole family out. people in the ghetto have no clue where we are going technologically. stem is the future. it's what we need to get the 7-year-olds geared upon. get them excited about stem because that's sustainability as well. it's a different type of sustainability, it's educating people to walk into the world where they can contribute and participate in this global community year 2040. >> the common thread throughout the middle east and america is a lot of young people who have had perhaps education they couldn't have had before in many middle eastern countries. they are better educated. there's no job at the end of the line. it creates frustration. so much that you have seen a lot of leaders toppled. i'm sure there's more to come. what
. that's folds. false. they make different choices in education. you see young minute majoring in matt and science. and more young women in gender study and literature. field that are not going pay as well. when they enter the workplace you see more women going in to non-profit and shorter hours and more men in and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason the two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man and woman in the investment bank, they got out of cold man sacks. those should be paid the same. they are paid the same. if there are not there avenues to sue. that's the big difference. >> what dow you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> i think the white house needs to have a counsel on men and boys. because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and women than the single men have lower earnings. you see they are far higher rates of boys cropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. and so if the white house wants to have
, but a nonprofit, a charity in its filing with the irs saying its mission is education. which means it pays no taxes and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot, too. >> in wisconsin, i cannot take anything of value from a lobbyist. i cannot take a cup of coffee. at alec, it is the opposite. you are wined and dined for days in order to hear about the special legislation. the head of shell oil fluid on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one of the largest utility companies was on the panel. he is presenting to legislators. they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate needs and special interest-dom and in meetings with legislators. >> the united states of alec. we will return to the special report by bill moyers in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we turn to part two of "the united states of alec." a special report by bill moyers airing this week on lawyers in company, but premiering today of here on "democracy now!" >> the most important business hap
with education. there is a way of solving this. the key is for the republicans and democrats to work together. >> thank you. >> there is a way to solve all of these challenges. while my opponent talked a very good game, the fact of the matter is his actions do not match his rhetoric. he is opposed to a comprehensive immigration reform. he is in favor of the arizona law and most of it was declared unconstitutional by the united states supreme court. my opponent thought the arizona law was so good he wanted to bring it here to nevada. the one thing i cannot believe he is opposed to is the dream act. he voted against it. at 80% or 20%. he voted against 100% of it. what does it say? it says if you are a youngster who came to the united states through no fault of your own and you are in college or you volunteered for military use, you should have a path to legal status. it could not be any more simple than themy opponent voted against it. net. he is on record saying if he remains in the united states senate, he will vote against it again. the latino families in the state and in this country deserv
you tips and advice thoeping your small business grow. it is education nation week. we wanted to do our part by looking at the opportunities available to current and future entrepreneurs. our past stories have taken us around the country to detroit and portland, oregon. this year, we didn't have to go any further than boston. there, we found a really unique program, a venture aksel lccele that's run by college students. they have the right idea educating entrepreneurs and getting them funding to grow their companies. 22 small business owners. >> our product will be the first organic, low-calorie ready to drink cocktail on the market. >> each one making a pitch for funding. and the most amazing thing. >> we have done a real lot with a real little. >> some of these pictures aren't even out of college yet. >> the marketing is essential. >> this pitchathon is part of a unique program called idea, a business accelerator that is developing new entrepreneurs at northeastern university in boston. >> it is a little bit nerve-racking to get up in front of all those people. every step is bring
-pupil funding. now these politicians say unless we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. faugh >>vicki: food banks are having a test time to keep their shells filled. jeff pierce shows us how the local community is pitching in. jeff >> hundreds of volunteers showed up at the food banks on saturday to help the pressing needs that local food banks are experiencing. >> people of us that potatoes and to do the day-to-day tasks. the bigger piece is trying to educate the committee about hunger, why there is a need and what they can do to make a difference. >> as the need has accelerated, food banks are having to rely more on individual help from the communities as the sources they have traditionally depended upon have diminished. >> many people come to us who need food assistance. the way the government is, the
education. and even in [speaker not understood], because by the way, you have to be academically ready to ascend and not just be at the labor reer level. -- laborer level. so, i'm happy, supervisor cohen, and president chiu, you understand where we are at and we are not turning a blind aye to this issue -- [multiple voices] >> thank you, commissioner. commissioner fewer. >> yes, i'd like to comment a little bit about looking at the state. quite frankly, when i saw this data, i myself was very, very shocked particularly about the students not on track for graduation. supervisor, i share your concern. i think as far as the pathway, this is a pathway to nowhere. so, i just want to emphasize about the difference between feel better and do better. i know if you're not really in this conversation all the time, what does it really mean when we give two sets of data that say, on track c or better and on track d or better. on that track d or better is a lie, it is a lie to all our students because we instituted an a through g graduation requirement to do two things, one is to give access so tha
. >> in 2012, he had shown commitment, reengaged in g. e. d., and was committed to his education, he was a faithful worker, and someone his manager could count on to be at work and serve as a role model. >> reporter: he was also known as a devoted father. >> he had really shown vast growth in terms of commitment to his self and goals and family. >> the police department released this stament which said in part -- statement which said in part, "we need community help and support for success within each strategy, especially when it comes to providing information which may lead to a violent crime being solved." and starting tomorrow, they will start using a new crime tip system. residents will be able to anonymously report crime online or via text message. more information will be released tomorrow, including instructions on how to use the new system. >>> an 18-year-old student at skyland high school in oakland was shot to death by police in may. officers say he pointed a gun at them so they had no choice. the man's family says he should not have been killed. family and supporters of ma
of quality in a child care setting is the training and education of the workforce, if we can up the bar on that. i think there's a lot that can be done. i think that, as far as quality is concerned -- you have about 28 states with a quality rating system. that is a really good thing. it is tough to be a parent. what questions do you ask? what do you look for? i think every parent wants the warm person who is going to be friendly and nice and you can click with because you want somebody who will love your children, but at the same time, the expectation should be if you are in a business with children, there should be other criteria. you should not have a history of violent offenses, so you would be no harm to the child. you should have some minimum training so that what you are doing can nurture the children and, hopefully, put them in a situation better ready to succeed when they start school. unfortunately, as i said, what we have seen from our studies is that is not happening. i want to end with one other thing it is called parents and the high costs of child care. we are not where we
voters will consider to measures to raise taxes for education. the governors proposition 30 is competing with proposition 38. which one is better for the schools? political reporter grace lee can give us a better understanding. >> it is hard to see which one is better for schools because it depends on your view of what works best. who do you think should handle the money? who do you trust? and how much do you want to pay? let's compare those propositions. >> proposition 38¢ money directly to the local schools in guaranties politicians cannot touch it. >> proposition 38 is waging a new campaign to funnel billions of dollars into schools. this attorney is the biggest backer, spending $20 million so far. she says that the money will not go to the general fund, but directly to the schools case through 12, and to early childhood programs. >> all of the money in 38 that is for the schools is barricaded from sacramento. >> proposition 38 would raise state income taxes for almost everyone on a sliding scale. for example, if you make $25,000 a per year you would pay an extra $124. $75,000? he wo
change these patterns are educating parents and use that getting drunk on the weekends is neither healthy, cool, nor an expected part of american culture. let me talk about treatment for drug use. in to the and 11, 21.6 million people aged 12 and older, that is 8.4%, it needed treatment for an illicit drug problem. of those only 2.3 million receive treatment at a special the facility. often, the reason for not seeking treatment include lack of coverage or an inability to afford it. while we have a long journey ahead with regard to prevention and treatment, the good news is we are embarking on a time when we are to the accessibility to achievement for the affordable care act, after parity disorder services, and we are actively working on quality treatment .hrough samhsa's efforts again, i want to thank you all for your interest today. and thank you for helping us to spread the message of recovery. i will turn the microphone back to dr. clark. >> thank you, pam hyde. since his appointment, r. gil kerlikowske has been a driving force in implementing the policy. he coordinates all aspects of
, and my fathermented us to have an education, and he knew that education was the key to a better life, but i think he thought all of us would just come right back home and try to work from there, but i grew up with lots of family and community support. i grew up, went to a segregated school. when they -- when brown versus board of education passed, georgia's answer was to just throw up these schools to supposedly give us equal, separate, but equal facilities so i only -- i only attended segregated schools, but in those schools, we had people who cared. we had teachers who cared, but they all -- one thing they drilled into us in the church, in our homes, and in the schools was that they expected us to do good. they expected us to go and do good and reach back and help others. [applause] >> it's interesting you say that because in the country right now, day three of the huge teacher strike in chicago so there's a battle right now for the soul of education, public education. >> yes. >> your daddy was killed by a white fellow. >> yes. >> go back to that time and what happened, what you kn
girls getting educated. we provide freeducation to over 350 girls. i think it's like a fire that will grow. every year, my hope becomes more. i think i can see the future. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "early start weekend." >> i believe she should resign, yes. >>> a top lawmaker calling for a u.s. ambassador to resign. we have reaction to the new intelligence report that the benghazi attack that killed four americans was an act of terror. >>> abortion, gun policy, the war on drugs. some of these social issues shaping the presidential race. all morning, we put them in focus. >> i can see in his face that there was a lot more to her story than even what she was willing to let on. >>> women hold up half the sky. the message of a new documentary from "new york times" columnist. in an interview exclusive with cnn he sits down with celebrities. >>> saturday, september 29th, i'm deb feyerick. >> good to have you with us this morning. we are starting with the new revelations on the deadly attack in libya. >> the attack that killed chris stevens and three other
the president and mitt romney agree on -- education reform. the details of their plans coming up next. >>> and a little riot with big consequences. the video just surfacing now of a fight at the apple product factory in china. >>> and did you hear what happened during monday night football? why it's more than just wins and money on the line here. we'll tell you about it. >>> and good afternoon. i'm jeff ranieri in the nbc bay area weather center. fog already building back at the coastline right now. and temperatures close to the 50s in san francisco. and plenty of heat in livermore with 85 degrees. if you're headed out to the giants game for tonight, do expect the fog and mid-50s. we're back with the seven-day forecast in minutes. >>> even if you're not a football fan, you might have heard what happened last night. the seemingly botched call on the final play of the game between the seattle seahawks and green bay packers. it clearly appears the packers intercepted the ball and won the game. however, the replacement referees ruled otherwise, saying the seahawks player had control of th
. with regard to the board of education and board of sups, i'd like to see -- hover is gone. in terms of institutional history and leveraging more, how that happened and maybe didn't happen or what was supposed to happen, really beginning to engage and have conversations around that, but beginning to drill down and actually have some movement. i think that it's important to have people who know the history but also have people who are living right now to make decisions to leave the city because of [inaudible]. some of the other things. >> thank you. >>> thank you. >> is there any other member of the public who has not spoken who would like to speak? seeing none, public comment is closed. colleagues, we have another also pretty substantive item that is still on the agenda. but i want to give you wang opportunity to make some wrapping remarks. obviously there's not going to be a solution for this very complicated issue, but i think it's important for us that we continue to talk about it. so, with that, supervisor olague. >> i want to make sure that, miss davis, were you able to complete
, everybody pays for education, and every year they get worse education and it costs more. we've dumbed down our school program to rush kids through the system. why not do it the other way? why not had let the achieving kids rush through the system and get away from this burgeoning ed accuracy? beyond that, we're spending money on things that aren't being productive for our economy. let these achieving students, send them the message that if you achieve you will be rewarded. the idea we're going to get any of this taxpayer money back is kind of a mirage. taxpayers never get any money back. it will move on to the next boondoggle. i think it's a good idea. >> half of property taxes go to schools to be fair. tracy, the kids issue, you can get them out of your house two years earlier. what do you make about that? >> you know what, the money issue to me is separate from the academic development issue. i don't think these kids should be rushed through school. i do think there's a reason they need these years to develop as people. when you do look at the dollars and cents, there are a lot of people
investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >> schieffer: and we're back now with our panel, larry sabato. i want to come back to you. how important do you think this debate is going to be, this first one? >> it's critical to mitt romney. he really does have to show his stuff there, and he has to-- he has to change his emage. he has the image of a kru club republican. he has to go after president obama in a coherent way with a real message. but, you know, history tells me, bob, that generally speaking, the challenger does gain from the first debate. it will be a surprise if he doesn't gain. and he very much needs to. he needs to get some momentum. based on history, i would say the odds favor mitt romney in the first debate. >> schieffer: let me ask you about your home state, virginia. your center is headquartered at u.v.a. what's happening there? is this going to come down to virginia? a lot of people think it might. >> well, it could. obviously, it would have to be very close to
and you will see a 9% increase for special education students over the five years, and a 6% increase in among the english language learners in math. we have a similar break down for the special ed students in terms of whether they took the csd over the five years, the cma or the kapa. eighth grade algebra, the proficiency rate is not shown here but the proficiency rate is 49-point 5% and what we have done in these years can you see the progress is towards participation where you have more and more students now at grade eight taking algebra. in 2008 we had 61% taking eighth grade algebra and today 95% of our eighth graders are enrolled in algebra. our proficiency rate at 49.5 percent. strategic plan goal three which is accountability. this is where we look at other measures other than the california standards test, so we look at all other measures that occurred during the year, and summarized here. the first one is attendance. attendance is percent instruction time. at every elementary, midland level there is slight increase in the instructional time showing more students are a
the idea that early education is talking to kindergarten and they're talking to the larger community and it transfers over. we have step ahead for middle from elementary to middle school and the promise from middle schools to high schools and then all of the community base the organizations that helped to support the out of school time, the summer learning, the after school programming. if we didn't have all of those support mechanisms in place and a lot of the folks that have really dived into the work that we're doing and committed to our work then i don't know if we could actually be tooting our horn the way we are and i want to give a shout out to the community based organizations and frankly have told us these are the things that we need to do, so some have stayed with us in and out and the other thing i want to remind ourselves is that we made some conscious decisions to invest. we not only cut back on things but we also felt strongly about professional development, about making sure that college and career was really important, and we did great investing and we tilled away t
an archive of a disappearing world? >> the education system that is a national machine turning up highly motivated students, what happens if a child does not fit the stereotype? our correspondent has been taking a look at a very different side of south korean education. >> to be successful in south korea, students need a obedience, discipline, and an insatiable appetite for study. at this alternative high school, success is measured slightly differently, in happiness. here the curriculum offers board games as well as mathematics. if you would never give away with this in a normal korean school. this is where they come when they fall off of the education conveyor belt. the teaching here is everything the traditional schooling is not. a would-be chefs with a troubled past. >> there were too many regulations of my old school. i had trouble sticking to them and i got angry. i used to bully and fight with other kids. that my parents got angry, so i ran away from home and i would get into other bad things. >> here he says the teachers are not only more relaxed, but crucially they teach at the
you can start figuring that out sooner. in fact, by thinking about where you want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. a 13 year-old is aacused of stealinggthis car, leading and crashing the vehicle.it happened in nootherr califorria. it all started when officers spotted the reported stolen police say he 13-yeaa-old took off ann flipped he car about a mleelater. hh teen was rushed to the hossital after the crash, but asslater released into his mother's ((2-shot toss to ((ad lib meteorollgist)) 3 ((traffic reporter ad libs)) 3 3 3 3 ad libs))((traffic reporter 3 meteorologist))((ad lib weather)) ((ad lib , meteorrlogist)) 3 ((traffic reporter ad libs)) 3 3 &p3 3 3 3- ((traffic reporter 3 meteorologist))((ad lib &weathe ((ad lii meteorologist)))) 3 meteorologist))((ad lii ((ad lib meteorologist)) 3 ((traffic reporter ad llbs)) &pmap bel air map wilkens map quaranttne ,33 3 are you our biggest an?then you can become.. ouu fan of everyday we'll pick one of our viewers f
, i don't know why the men would want to hurt them. that's because he had been educated by women and encouraged, from the first moment and nurtured by a women who was empowered and he was able to see the world through a completely different lens. that's why it's about empowering the women to impact the men. it's not that the men are inherently the problem. unfortunately, they've been raised in a culture that hasn't encouraged them to see the world. >> what a remarkable spirit changing the world and changing men one at a time. >>> next hour, actress gabrielle union tells us about meeting a 15-year-old girl in vietnam who stunned her with extraordinary courage. turning oppression into opportunity for women worldwide is going to air on pbs on monday and tuesday. >>> there is more positive news on the home front, if you're in the market to sell. home prices on the rise for the third straight month. we'll tell you where. like myself... ing i had pain in my pelvic area... and bleeding that wasn't normal for me. she said i had to go to the doctor. turned out i had uterine cancer, a type
calling williams -- colleen williams? >> what is the one thing we can do to improve education in this country? >> i have served over 15 years on different school boards. it plans to stand the importance of education. it works best on the local level, works best when you have board members and parents involved, a community in fall, and many have at decatur's involved. when of the mistakes that has been made at that federal level is the passage of the no child left behind act. it started out with good intentions, but if has not accomplished what it should have. it has taken educators at of the classroom, and we need to keep educators in the classroom if they are going to address the needs of students. important thing is to make sure these kids arrive in kindergarten ready to learn. if they are behind, they will never catch up. i will not win a nobel prize for making that discovery. the rhetoric of senator fischer and her proposals to not add up. her budget proposal will result in deep cuts both your early childhood education and head start. it is a fact. i am not exaggerating. i
. >> reporter: just last wednesday, the trusted educator and volleyball and basketball coach was arrested at his home in albany in suspicion of having an inappropriate relationship with a student under 14. >> the allegations didn't sound like him. >> reporter: azumizaki posted bail the next day but charged had not been filed. but this morning, the investigation took a turn. >> reporter: we >> reporter: -- >> we got a call this morning for an alleged suicide. he did leave some correspondence behind. i don't want to get into the details of it but he did leave some correspondence behind. >> reporter: today he discussed the teacher's suicide. >> we don't know what to think about that. in a way it could mean guilt, in another he could have been so -- distraught. we don't know what to think about it. heather holmes. >>> the body of one of two fishermen who went missing off the coast was discovered this evening. family members say they found the body off the rocks of pigeon point after the coast guard called off it's search. 63-year-old carl dang disappeared yesterday. two other men made it to shore s
noncollege whites. 27% were college-educated whites and 12% were minorities. since then, the minorities doubled to 26%. the noncollege whites all the way down to 39%. you take reagan's share of the vote in 1984 among noncollege whites and protect them in the 2008 election, the other thing that changed is the democrats in the first decades after world war ii, come about again change in the 60s and 70s. seventys and 80s. college and noncollege, today in polling, it is nine or 10. i would argue that obama wins and once it gets done, it produces an environment in which all the numbers we are talking about, "a-team" 40. as you want, you want 80% of nonwhite voters. those voters represent the 20 present as they did last time. the internal composition of the white vote is changing in a way that makes it more accessible for him to get there. to me coming have to look not only at education but gender. it basically creates four quadrants. if you look at 2008, noncollege white man. a noncollege white women, he will drop. the fourth quadrant was the college-educated white women. in all polling, inc
a four year college education or have a job and that is the measure here and a couple of things to say is that i think that -- i think the test scores are great but the things we need to touch the students also is a great sense of resiliency. if you don't get it once you can try it again and you know what? you can try it again and again and you can be successful and takes some of us twice to take algebra like myself and for some of us is takes three and the deep critical thinking that we're sending our students from san francisco out with a real critical mind that they're going to question. they're going to question how things have been and how come they're different from the other people and the kind of students we want to educate here in san francisco for the future society in san francisco and i wanted us to keep in mind about the graduation rates and also how we get there so are we engaging students in a really thoughtful way? are we allowing them to guide us on what is engaging as curriculum and what is not? and this critical thinking i think is so important, so i would like
who have educational barriers also have mental health issues, public health issues, child welfare, there is a lot of cross over to youth, dependency system and really struggle with educational barriers in terms of getting access to the school system. and, so, cjcj has been studying arrest trends in san francisco for decades before the board of supervisors multiple times in the past on those. so, i just wanted to share with you that educational barriers, specifically for youth of color, is also sort of mirrored in arrest trends in san francisco. the latest study we did was in april 2012 and, in fact, less than 9% of the city's youth population is african-american and they actually comprise 56% san francisco juvenile drug felony arrest. that's a huge, really unusual disparity that actually is more unusual than elsewhere in california. and especially for female youth. so, the city's african-american female youth account for over 40% of drug felony arrests for african-american female youth in california, 40%, and have a arrest rates 50 times higher than their counterparts in other cou
.atwill change if with the programs i've talked about aif you help with job retraining and education. i am a firm liever that our america 2,000 education problem is the answer. it will take a while educate, but it is a good program. her best hope for short term is job retraining if she was thrown out of work at a defence plant. tell her it's not all that gloomy. we're the uentd states. we faced tough problems before. look when the democrats had both the white house and the congress, it was throug. can do better. the way to do better is not to tax and spend, but to retrain and get the control of the mandatory programs. i am much more apt mystic about this country than some. >> mr. perot -- mr. perot, you have one minute, sir. >> well, the defense is going to have to convert to industries. the sooner they start the sooner they'll finish. there will be a significant. it is important not to let the industrial base deteriorate. we had someone who i regret said it, in the president staff said he doesn't care if we made potato chips or computer chips, anybody that cares about it, care as great deal. you
an education, despite no other virtue then we were born here. nobody deserves to be an american. nobody held a contest and said you were okay, you deserve it, you get to be an american. by the grace of god, we are americans. but this little guy was born into one of the worst environments possible, into a country where you will probably starve to death and get cholera and a bunch of other diseases, probably. if not, you might get maimed. so you might have this. okay, i went to bed hungry a few times because i was born to a teenage mother. okay, my life was pretty bad. let me tell you something. nobody cared -- nobody here has had a really bad. this guy has it bad. now he is laying their dying because his right foot is blowing off, his other foot is partially blown off. he had gangrene and he is dying a slow and miserable death. of course, being an american, what we want to do? we want to help the kid. but do i really want to help the kid -- i'm running a safe house. i am in the middle of baghdad territory, i am risking the lives of my agents if i help this young man because that is not my job
not matter, nor did household income or education. getting maugham's past that critical two years is key. >> baltimore history. the city's first whether predicting crab took a stroll. we will introduce you to baltimore bill and tell you whether we're in for an early winter. >> and college students anncr: more anti-maryland ads. from this west virginia casino. they want marylanders to keep coming to west virginia... casinos like theirs. spending one hundred seventy million a year. question seven will keep those dollars at home. with a limited expansion of gaming that will mean... hundreds of millions for schools in the baltimore area... and across the state... according to the department of legislative services. and with independent audits required by law... question seven means millions for maryland schools. guaranteed. [captioning made possible by constellation energy group] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> alive, local, late breaking. you are watching wbal-tv 11 news at 5:00 p.m. with stan stovall and donna hamilton. >> news tonight, a group of towso
something about education and college students and help of that kind. half -- one out of two of the full-time college students in the united states are receiving some form of federal aid. but there, again, we found people that there under the previous administration, families that had no limit to income were still eligible for low-interest college loans. we didn't think that was right. and so, we have set a standard that those loans and those grants are directed to the people who otherwise could not go to college, their family incomes were so low. so, there are a host of other figures that reveal that the grant programs are greater than they have ever been, taking care of more people than they ever have. 7.7 million elderly citizens who were living in the lowest 20% of earnings -- 7.7 million have moved up into another bracket since our administration took over, leaving only 5 million of the elderly in that bracket when there had been more than 13 million. >> mr. president, in a visit to texas -- in brownsville, i believe it was, in the rio grande valley -- you did observe that the econo
is really to educate the commissioners and staff and to start focusing on some sensible ways in which some of these technology glitches can be capped ended. gerri: educate the staff. high-frequency trading has been around for awhile. it seems to me these folks should know everything about it. why don't they? >> i think there is clearly a lag time between when government becomes aware of technological advances and when it starts to understand them fully. i'm not justifying the time frame that has gone on because we have had these problems, as you pointed out, for over two years now. but i think the government is well advised to proceed only when it knows what it is actually doing, rather than just jumping into the freight. gerri: a point. and here's what they will talk about tomorrow, preventing errors in trading car responding to market crises once they have occurred, so it will take this on with people who are inside the industry and people who are critics of the industry. how should they go about either regulating this or changing it or fixing it because you know as well as i do that inv
in education. that investment is not limited to more money. it also means getting parents involved. it also means expecting more from everybody along whole education ecosystem, from administrators to policy-makers to teachers come expecting more out of everyone. so what i have on the table in san antonio is basically a 1/8 cent sales tax that will cost the median household in the city $7.81 per year. mind you, every day in texas, it cost $359.81 to keep a juvenile incarceration. what we have on the table is the opportunity to educate more than 22,404-year-olds with -- 22,400 4-year-olds with high quality pre-k. >> i don't believe that taxes are inherently evil. >> that will be tweeted, by the way. [laughter] give them a second. [laughter] >> i do believe that taxes are inherently evil. i'd like them and nobody likes the impaired but it will the voters in san antonio that there is no way to sugarcoat this. i am asking you for this tax increase. more than that, i believe in you. i believe that may put it in front of you, you can make a decision as to whether or not you want to make this inves
. investment in education long- term is an investment in jobs. our children have to be able to compete in the 21st century, so this is not about building jobs. this is about bringing those companies here and building on the assets. we can do it, but we have to work to do that. >> what about jobs and being specific about jobs? >> congress does not create jobs. congress can prohibit or promote in the private sector, a predominantly small business, so i have spent a good deal of time talking to people in small business. one thing they find is the rash of lawsuits. i have a law that would change that as opposed to litigation. secondly, if you speak to small business people, they are talking about the uncertainty created by taxes coming forward on january 1. i support and now that we have not allowed those taxes to go up. now president obama said we ought to extend those tax cuts. we need to do it once again. regulatory reform, i have had a number of bills on which i have voted that have gone to the senate. we need senators to our. >> the second question comes from me, and it is for you. yo
these to transition to enforcement. as much as we educate and campaign and talk, there is still a role for enforcement. we've been working with the police department and your agency to focus on smart enforcement. the police surely don't have enough resources to be everywhere every minute. where do you put your energy. we think you should be putting your energy here. if we know these 20 intersections -- they're not all intersections, 20 locations are the worst and the most problematic, are where most people get hurt and should height vulnerable road users, people walking and biking, are 30 times more likely to be hurt at one of these intersections. if we know these are the problem, let's put our enforcement efforts there. i would be happe happy to go there and put our materials out. i would like to see the police department and the m.t.a. efforts focused on these locations. i would like to see you all coming back on an annual basis reporting, and letting them know how it goes. we know these are problem intersections, might will be a problem with the makeup of the street? possibly see. i'd love to see a
, but as a non-profit, a charity. in its filing with the irs, alec says its mission is education which means it pays no taxes and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests, i can go down there, and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had that meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important iss
they are enthusiastic. he has been emphasizing a lot of the issues on things like medicare, cuts to education, tax cuts to the rich. he has been very forceful about contrasting his views on things. they would do all sorts of things. they had some success with it. the way he has tried to paint romney as an out of touch private equity guy who would not know a white working class person it became up and bit them and the nose. romney needed to reach the huge number to be competitive. i think the obama team realized that there are some very opposite things about romney. i think this has been successful. we cannot leave this without saying a word about republican performance. if they had sat down and try to optimize the things they might say that may tick off the democratic party and raise concern, and it probably could not have done much better. way theflects the republica republican capture the elements that are far away from the media voter. social and economic issues, the whole business of paul ryan and embracing this kind of ayn rand approach to american society and economics. it is far away from the po
say unless we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. >>> welcome back to eyewitness news cbs 5 the last saturday in september 2012 when go out on hotter now than yesterday. some readings across the bay for degrees warmer in san francisco let's 6215 degrees hotter in livermore at 93. san jose mid-seventies common. the thought compressed to 700 ft., that keeps san francisco cool this evening at 58, otherwise we drop down in the mid '80s in the tri valley oakland now 61 degrees. that high pressure strengthens it rents up and produces an off shore flow which means dry winds from inland areas moving offshore in an easterly direction that increases potential for fire danger, what dissipates the offshore wind we dissipates the offshore wind we makes it easy for anne to manage her finances when she's on the go. even when sh
education system to free up the knowledge to make it look attractive for minorities to have the desire to want to learn the way out to be just as successful as those that they look up to? >> writing the book one of the things that has stuck with me is yon black and brown men, young boys are not accepting. culturally part of it is societal but the dinosaur had the ice age. we have education and technology. they did not make the adjustment it is not here. if the black brown mail this not make the adjustment they will not be here. we have to make it safe for our children to be smart, respectful, individua ls because what i was a boy i wanted to be excepted so bad i or myself to me i try. i will never let that happen again. to say if i cannot change the people around me you have to be afraid to stand by yourself that is the clearest it will ever be. there is a tendency to be accepted so bad people have all kinds of estimations but a man would do anything to take care of the family. not that i would not do that. and a woman sought a man who do anything you could do it every wanted the you w
cut education by 20%. you can't do this by shoving 30, 35 people into a class and just teaching to some test... these are all issues that really he personally cannot relate to. to be able to afford an education, to want the very best public education system for your children. we're sitting on a bunch of shale gas. there's natural gas under my town. it's a game changer. ♪ ♪ it means cleaner, cheaper american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the mostst advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ ♪ [ romney ] my plan is to help the middle class. trade has to work for america. that means crack down on cheaters like china, it means open up new markkets. next, we've got to balance the budget. you've got to cut the deficit. you've got to stop spending more money than we take in. and finally champion small business. have tax
wealth and privilege but he e of aere he is becaus great education. obama 1 virginia in over mittolds a lead romney in virginia. abc7 is your station for the election. follow us on twitter for updates the campaign trail. >> some storms are moving into area. >> bob ryan is tracking them the weather center. these are slow-moving storms warningseason for the hail. possibility of some there has been one confirmed in the mountains. people around front royal, these warnings for the shenandoah valley and jackson, woodstock, see those areas of purple? that is where there could be some hail. the other one continues to move off toward the east. all of this is moving gradually east so it will be the metropolitan area s evening, 7:00, at 9:00, with some thunderstorms have had temperatures the 80's. widespread wind or damage. the new warnings are out until 6:45. >> a dramatic scene on wisconsin avenue. againsts a protest unfair foreclosures that the street in front of fannie mae. many were arrested however most them have never faced foreclosure. cooper has the story. >> it was billed as a protest
't matter... and he supports paul ryayan's budget which couldouut education by 20%. you can't do this by shoving 30, 35 people into a class and just teaching to some test... these are all issues that really he personally cannot relate to. to be able to afford an education, to want the very best public education system for your children. anncr: their dishonest ads are everywhere. a west virginia casino spending a fortune... to stop question seven. they don't want competition. the washington post wrote the casino behind the ads is... "most concerned with its own bottom line." and the baltime sun says it "doesn't have maryland... taxpayers' interests at heart." so when you see these adads remember... they're about what's good for west virginia's casino... not maryland. voteor maryland jobs and schools.s. vote for question seven. >> and now the toyota sports desk brought to you by your local toyota dealers. >> the kings are being worked out with the retirement plan issues. and many clinic was attended to refreshen skills. nl east is possibly one of the most com
is your educational policy? we don't have answers. the only thing is polarization is reducing political discourse into something that is simplistic to. not only the arab world is falling into that trap but we in the west read this situation to these lengths and egypt is in danger. too many men are wearing head scarves now. the symbol is dynamic and you can laugh but i am sorry to tell you the media coverage is too often the case that we are reducing the reality of a country on symbols. how many women and how many men. what is your position on sharia, if you use the term is over. that is the reality of the simplistic discussion we have. but once again what i am saying to the muslim countries in the arab world you cannot blame the west to reduce the political discourse. this is what is happening in the muslim countries themselves. this is the problem. by going beyond us, polarization is there and we have to move beyond us and we have to face -- this is the second part of the book. what i am trying to tackle, way forward. the critical questions that we have. we have five main areas where w
it by programs so this is looking at our special education students as well as our english language learners and we do see in 2008 we tested three two 98 students on the test and as compared to 212 we tested 2,094 students. in the first three years which is 2008, nine, and ten, we were introducing the cma or the state was introducing the cma through the grade levels so first was the elementary grades. then the secondary grades and then high school subject grades, so it was being introduced, so when you look at the last two years you will see that we have increased the number of students taking the special ed because it was 1,920 in 2011 and now in 2012 we have this amount taking the csd. the english language adult proficiency level over these years is 12% increased but has to be looked at with the lens that they were students taking moving on to take zvzv okay. over the last two years we did see increase in csd and when we disaggregated the results from movement we see the same trend as we saw in the district which is growth for matched students. okay. there is also a break down that we
, the last meaningful imprao*ufms in the 1980s, it dates the 1960s and prior, educational requirements have advanced since the construction of these facilities, town school's vision is a mor modern environment than just pure additional space. this project is the result of a ten year search and review of all the options throughout the city that have on-site improvement, expansion, splitting the school and all other sorts of options to get the education conditions appropriate for the school for the future, more than four years ago, the school revitalized and wanted fo expand, for three years, the school has worked with the faculty to determine educational requirements, during this time, the school has worked closely with the environment and bidding department with the city of san francisco to explore possibilities on this site and to be on top of the urban contract development issues, through this multiyear dialog, we've worked closely with the neighbors as a group, this project reflects this consensus. if i may, i want to outline some of the key points, we're 54 thousand feet, the proposal i
ways that we do outreach more extensively, to educate employers about what their responsibilities are and to educate employees of what their rights are. >> again, no answer to proactive verification. >> i will continue with the mayor's response to the civil grand jury. for finding number 2, i don't think the department responded to that one t city has not investigated related surcharges to determine whether employees are generating [inaudible] that we did disagree with that finding, the mayor supported and signed legislation amending the health care security ordinance and looked specifically at this issue, we are going to put a fine point to in the next year's report. so, finding 11, employees with would or more employers would have two or more hra's for what constitutes medical expenses and with differing time limits, so we said partially disagree because there wasn't a partially agree answer, while there could be two or more hra's which is absolutely true, time limits are now standardized as per the 2011 amendment. finding 12, hra's may not be an allowable option in reading the
's a provocative new approach to education called grit, meant to give kids just that. >> it's really about how do you get kids actually to not only experience failure but recognize that those hard moments are the keys to future success. >> i would say i don't trust anyone who hasn't failed. >> right, right. >>> and kate snow reports on a man who learned his quirks were much more than just odd behavior. >> i would silently freak out. >> and turn to a very unlikely teacher for help. >> i have been in therapy now for 16 years. >> you have literally studied howard stern? >> yeah. >>> plus one big secret of jon stewart's success on "the daily show." >>> and how the fifty shades novels have saved a tiny town in maine. >> so the big question is, have you read it? >> you said you weren't going to ask me that question. >> i was lying. >> all that and more on "rock center with brian williams." >>> good evening, and welcome. right now, as of tonight, 1.4 million of our fellow citizens are serving on active duty in the u.s. military. they're serving domestically and all over the world, and after a decade of
was a leader in education funding. erika derry: and the fact that california isn't making it a priority frustrates me. dan hurd: i'm ashamed of that, and i don't want this to continue for my daughter. brenda kealing: prop 38 is going to bring a lot of money to our schools. suzan solomon: the money stays at the school site. cade derry: what i would really like to see is that the teachers... that were laid off come back to the school. navaz hurd: a smaller class size. navaz hurd: as a mom i want that. as a teacher i want that. >> a sliding hillside in marin hasty the neighbors worried. the property has been slowly washing away during the winter rain, so times not so slowly. the owner is not doing anything t it planning aakeo they plan on getting its on this property on scenic ave because it is a hazard. y h been looking long and hard for the honor >> he has not been in contact with us >> iieve he went back on to paki >>urin the 2011r, seriousroblem fn trighte neighbors. the cy was forced to step in and save the street and the surroundin homes, holding back the mud with concrete barriers.
for education not to be siphoned off by profits for banks >>> the card was traded back to yale graduate 2000 >>> the company responded to our question and an e-mail saying their program allows students to receive funds faster there are no hidden fees colleges and universities save millions to go electronic and the account is cheaper than the top for national banks and a prepaid cards we survey ever quarter. >>> i close the account >>> going back to the old fashion way of student aid >>> it's ridiculous to get away with this deal it is highway robbery that is a lot of money for students >>> what about the schools that are signing up for the program the american association of community colleges had no comment san joaquin delta college said it signed up because of students get financial aid quicker and cuts down on check fraud hire one says it will consider waiving fees on students at the tracy campus. sharon chin cbs 5 >>> roads and landmarks misplaced and missing in the new apple maps at. a suggestion from the company's ceo >>> put in the bread on red light cameras what communities will hav
send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. in the people, businesses, and organizations that call the bay area home. whether it's helping a nonprofit provide safe, affordable housing within the city, supporting an organization that's helping kids find jobs and stay in school, or financing the expansion of a local company that's creating healthier workplaces, what's important to the people of the bay area is important to us. and we're proud to work with all those >>> people of lost a loved one to accident or illness say changes their lives forever tonight the personal story of a bay area psychiatrist who face the death of his teenage son dr. kim mulvihill of that loss convinced him his profession has got one thing all wrong. >>> graveyards full of grief and loss, but here on mt. tam applies in marin county
and being raised by a single mom and being proud of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already
county as a place that needs help with education. you see like much of the country there is an achievement gap. if one be area organizations working hard to close the gap and its president and executive director and board member join us this morning thinking so much for joining us. tulsa about the project is a new school. >>> it is larger than the for the school. the project is about six years old. working people between the ages of 8 and 22. and we started >>> tells about the school. what is its mission? >>> the mission of the school is to try to ensure that kids fall in love with reading and at the connect with old control thinking and self esteem. >>> how is it different from other schools? >>> is different from other schools because it's so large focus on honoring your culture. honoring who you are. its focus is for you to feel good in a sense of pride about yourself, your family, your community and your abilities. and i love it because it's a large percentage of black children and the demographics of shown in marin city and many hispanic children. but the idea
of young people. the legacy of the educational inequality is an economy operating at half power, never getting the qualifications that they could get, never turning the wages that they could earn. the true cost of this cannot be counted in pounds alone. this is a huge drag on the economy, but more than that, this is part of the natural justice and everything that we liberal democrats stand for. if you strip away all of the outer layers, what do you find? the unshakable belief in freedom. not the libertarian freedoms, but the rich sound of liberal freedom, amplified and sustained by the thing that gives the real meaning, opportunity, and the freedom to be who you are. the opportunity, -- [applause] the freedom to be who you are, the opportunity to be who you could be. this is the liberal promise. and that is why this party has always been the party of education. because just as there can be no real freedom without opportunity, there can be no real opportunity without education. and every parent knows how it feels when you lead a child into the first day of school, and that looked to giv
in education of our children 84% of respondents on the survey agreed to this statement. agreed or strongly agreed to this statement. you can clap. [applause] okay. i am coming to my last two slides, so you can have a sigh of relief from numbers and how did sfusd perform compared to other school districts in california and how do you think we did? okay. so as you can see we are -- when we say we're one of the highest performing districts here is the performance of all the other districts. we just took a sample of five others as well as the state so the state is at 57% proficiency and we are at 61%. last year to this year the state moved from 54 to 57 and we moved from 57 to 61. 60.5 percent rounded was 61%. csd map -- again this is grades two through 11. you will see that the state is at 52%. we're at 57% proficiency. their growth was 50 to 52%. ours was 56 to 57%. and with that i am going to turn it back to -- what was the reason? the cause? the validity behind these, the best practices. >> thank you. so in looking how our sites performed overall, our school communities it wa
thing we should be concentrating on to improve education in this country? >> i'm a former school board member of 20 years. i started out in a two-room school house, was elected to that board and then served over 15 years on the valentine school board. i understand the importance of education. it is a priority for me. but it works best at the local level. it works best when you have school board members involved, when you have parents involved, when you have a community involved and when you have educators involved. one of the mistakes i believe that has been made at the federal level is the package of the no child left behind act. i think it started out with good intentions, but it hasn't accomplished what it should have. it has taken educators out of the classroom, and we need to keep them in the classroom if they are going to address the needs of students. >> senator? >> the most important thing is to make sure that these kids arrive in kindergarten ready to learn. if they are behind, they are never going to catch up. i am not going to get a nobel prize for making that discovery. it
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